Cheese plant shortage shock

Retro plant trend sees the cheese plant Monstera deliciosa in short supply says Matt Appleby, resulting in a shortage of cheese plants

cheese plant
Cheese plants are selling like hot cakes
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There’s been a surprising shortage of cheese plants in the houseplant departments of garden centres in the UK.

The revival in house plants sparked by Instagram pictures posted by millenials has seen price rises of 20% for the cheese plant Monstera deliciosa – with sizes above 1.5m not available – according to indoor plant specialists.

cheese plant
Cheese plants are selling like hot cakes

Indoor Garden Design director Ian Drummond says nostalgia for the retro favourite has helped fuel demand: “Yes, the monstera is super popular at the moment and has been for a few years.”

“The house plant revival started with succulents and was shortly followed by the monstera which I think is because it’s nostalgic of the 1970s.

“The result of this is the monstera is in really high demand and some sizes not always available from growers which results in consumers having to pay a premium price.”

Cheese plant shortage

Plants@Work chairman Madeleine Evans agrees that cheese plants are in short supply and prices has risen this year. “There is definitely a return to retro plants again, for instance Monstera. It’s in short supply at the moment and prices are up.” She says succulents and money trees (crassula) remain popular too because of their “architectural” look.

Monstera has been voted the 2018 Office Plant of the Year Judges said: “The leaf has been prominent in design and has a great aesthetic and retro appeal.”

They added that Monstera deliciosa makes a statement, is hardy, and they would like to see it used more to green up homes and offices.

The plant was the overall winner by a 5 to 3 vote. The other two plants in the running were Pilea peperomoides and Maranta tricolour.

Cheese plant

The plant has holes in its leaves, which make it resemble Emmental cheese, hence its common name the cheese plant.

Houseplants have seen huge growth of 50% or more in garden centres and other retailers such as Ikea in the last two years, powered by Instagram pictures, nostalgia and appreciation of the benefits they have for cleaning air in homes.

Plants@Work have launched a new book covering 30 years of research titled Plants for Wellbeing as part of National Plants@Work week in July. The book covers Sick Building Syndrome and biophilia research. The sixth annual National Plants@Work week is being promoted with a pop-up green office, a plant library and through the book’s findings.

Matt Appleby

About Matt Appleby

Matt is a former teacher turned journalist. He took up writing while in New Zealand and trained as a journalist there. He has since written five books (three on cricket and two on gardening) with The Children's Garden due out in spring 2016 published by Frances Lincoln. He writes for Horticulture Week and other publications. Married with two boys, aged 3 and 6 he lives in London.
@mattapple1
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