The best of Chelsea

It’s show time! The RHS Chelsea Flower Show is on this week, with gardeners around the world eagerly awaiting to see the latest in garden design unveiled. Jean Vernon picks her five favourite gardens.

Royal Bank of Canada Garden
Royal Bank of Canada Garden. Image: Jean Vernon
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A Perfumer’s Garden in Grasse

Designer: James Basson. Sponsor: L’Occitane

I love the naturalistic planting in this garden. It exudes peace and tranquility in a rustic, simple elegance. Representing the historical decline and current renaissance of the traditional perfume plantations of the Grasse perfume industry, the garden design is beautifully balanced in a soft pallete of colours and rich in natural fragrance.

LOccitane garden
A Perfumer’s Garden in Grasse by L’Occitane. Image: Jean Vernon

The Beauty of Islam

Designer: Kamela Bin Zal. Sponsor: Al Barari

This garden is stunning in its simplistic use of colour, texture and shapes. It’s a contemporary take on traditional Islamic garden design and reflects the beauty of Arabic and Islamic culture. The stark white Islamic archways and the beautiful use of water linking through the design creates a peaceful sanctuary and a place to nurture the soul. Its subtle planting of spices and herbs, such as cardamom, rosemary and olives, hint at the evocative and cultural spice trade of the Islamic and Arabic culture.

The Beauty of Islam garden
The Beauty of Islam. Image: Jean Vernon

The Telegraph Garden

Designer: Marcus Barnett. Sponsor: The Telegraph

The more you stand and admire this garden, the more you see. It’s a garden of many levels and hidden depths. First impressions are of its elegant geometrical and blocked planting of perfect proportions. But then the intricacies of the tonal plantings become apparent. It’s inspired by the De Stijl Movement and uses clear primary colours, which are emphasised, offset and balanced by the restful use of greens and white.

Telegraph Garden
Telegraph Garden. Image: Jean Vernon

Royal Bank of Canada Garden

Designer: Matthew Wilson. Sponsor: Royal Bank of Canada

Shapes, lines and contours characterise a garden and in this one it’s a celebration of the curve. Beautiful curved paths, a circular water feature of several levels and a cloud pruned olive tree each accentuate the voluptuous feel of this garden. The garden also portrays a simple message; the importance of water to not just our plants and gardens, but for the planet too.

Royal Bank of Canada Garden
Royal Bank of Canada Garden. Image: Jean Vernon

Sentebale- Hope in Vulnerability

Designer: Matt Keightley. Sponsor: The David Brownlow Charitable Foundation

There’s something very humbling and earthy about this garden. The dusty red earth transports you to South Africa, but the fresh, vibrant planting is rich, dense and uplifting. The garden is inspired by Sentebale’s Mamahato Children’s Centre, due to open in 2015 to help Lesotho’s vulnerable children. It’s designed to raise awareness of Sentebale’s mission to tackle the stigma of HIV in adolescents, helping to provide access to care and education and providing psychosocial support.

Sentebale garden
Sentebale – Hope in Vulnerability. Image: Jean Vernon

 

Jean Vernon

About Jean Vernon

Jean Vernon is a slightly quirky, bee friendly, alternative gardener. She doesn’t follow the rules and likes to push the boundaries a bit just to see what happens. She has a fascination for odd plants, especially edibles and a keen interest in growing for pollinators especially bees. She’s rather obsessed with the little buzzers. Telegraph Gardening Correspondent, mostly testing and trialing products and Editor-In-Chief for Richard Jackson’s Garden.
@TheGreenJeanie
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