5 fab cut flowers

Whether it’s a small garden picked posy, or a vase of cornflowers, a floral arrangement doesn’t need to cost the earth or be extravagant. Five renowned florists take a few common garden flowers and transform them into exquisite forms.

floral arrangement
Zita Elze

Simply Larkspur: by Zita Elze

Zita Elze champions the British larkspur. These annual delphiniums have tall spires of flower heads in hues of blue, white or pink. Easy to grow from seed in the garden, these delightful flowers are perfect for as cut flowers to adorn the table for summer parties, al fresco dining or weddings. The flowers can also be dried for winter arrangements. Create a loose, informal arrangement such as Zita’s in a vase, brimming with textural detail. NB All parts of the larkspur plants are toxic and the flowers are unscented.

floral arrangement
Hattie Fox

Take a Bouquet on the Wild Side: by That Flower Shop

Hattie Fox from That Flower Shop celebrates the glory of the natural world in her work with a free, loose and wild style that lends itself naturally to British flowers and foliage. She has a passion for British foliage and uses the green tones of leaves and stems in her arrangements. Her Take a Bouquet on the Wild Side is wild and loose and overflowing, seasoned with fresh foliage that offsets the flowers, including hornbeam, euonymus and golden privet mixed with locally grown flowers that include nepeta, delphiniums, astrantias, ox-eye daisies, foxgloves stocks and peonies.

Floral arrangement
Stephen Wicks and Mark Welford

Clouds of Alliums: by Bloomsbury Flowers

Stephen Wicks and Mark Welford of Bloomsbury Flowers show the versatility and beauty of the allium in their floral designs for British Flowers Week. These easy-to-grow garden flowers include a vast array of useful plants, from garlic, chives, onions and leeks for the kitchen table to the divine and exquisite balls of (mostly) purple delight that create dazzling fireworks in our gardens and flower displays. The foliage is usually discarded and the sculptural heads make for stunning floral arrangements. Bloomsbury Flowers have cut them short for British Flowers Week to focus on the textural detail of the flower heads, which are made up of hundreds of individual flowers and created some fascinating, intricate designs.

floral arrangement
Jay Archer

Rockin' the Lupin: by Jay Archer

Jay Archer fell in love with flowers and floristry just five years ago. She creates stunning arrangements for weddings and has a real aptitude for natural, asymmetrical designs on a grand scale. For British Flowers Week she has transformed a common, cottage garden classic, the lupin, into a pop sensation. She uses the vibrant, clashing flower heads of twisting lupins in an arrangement that resembles bursting fireworks. It’s brimming over with euphorbia, alliums, delphiniums with accents of beech and oak foliage.

floral arrangement
Charlotte Slade

A Catherine Wheel of Flowers: by Jane Packer Flowers

Charlotte Slade of Jane Packer Flowers had a Saturday job at a florist while she was studying for her A levels. She’s now an accomplished florist. For British Flowers Week Charlotte has taken the humble snapdragon (antirrhinum) and wired individual flower heads from the snapdragon spires into one exquisite, dreamy bouquet. In another arrangement she has used the gentle curve of the flower spikes to crease a Catherine wheel of colour graduating from soft yellow though shades of orange and red to deep, rich pink.

floral arrangement
floral arrangement
Floral arrangement
floral arrangement
floral arrangement

British Flowers Week celebrates the beauty of homegrown flowers and was championed by five British florists using common or garden flowers. The resulting arrangements were not just inspirational but simply stupendous.